Coordinated Program

Overview of the Program

The Coordinated Program (CP) is housed within the Department of NHM and the School of Applied Sciences. It is a graduate level practicum program, incorporating supervised practice with graduate coursework. Completion of the program requires 36 hours of graduate credit and 1325 hours of supervised practice. Program graduates are awarded the Master of Science in Food and Nutrition Services and receive a verification statement signifying they are eligible to sit for the Registration Examination for Dietitians.

Eight students are enrolled in the supervised practice component from May through May. Students complete a minimum of 1325 hours of supervised practice experiences in a variety of rotations: general clinical, food service management, renal nutrition, nutrition support, long-term care, WIC, and child nutrition programs. Throughout the program, CP students meet with program director to assess progress.

The Coordinated Program in Dietetics at the University of Mississippi is currently seeking full accreditation by The Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 312/899-0040 ext 5400..

Mission: The mission of the Coordinated Program in Dietetics is to prepare competitive nutrition professionals by combining graduate courses with supervised practice experiences to offer the student diverse exposures in education, research, and practice.

 

Program goals:

 

1 . To prepare students to demonstrate knowledge of the research process and to apply research in all aspects of professional practice.

Expected Program Outcomes:

  1. Over a 5-year period, 20% of graduates will have either published or presented their research in a peer reviewed journal or at a professional meeting
  2. Over a 5 year period, 50% of students will complete a directed independent study or thesis related to FSA or CAN
  3. Over a 5 year period 75% of students will agree that they are competent in developing an evidence based practice plan based on research in their field of study.

 

2. To offer two emphasis areas: Food Service Administration (FSA) and Child and Adolescent Nutrition (CAN) which will enable graduates to demonstrate advanced understanding in their area of choice by combining graduate level coursework and supervised practice activities.

Expected Program Outcomes:

  1. Over a 5 year period, 10% of CP Graduates will obtain employment in the FSA or CAN related field of practice
  2. Over a 5 year period 20% of CP Graduates will collaborate with their preceptors to develop and implement a FSA or CAN evidence based project that can be used for program outcomes assessment at their supervised practice site.
  3. 50% of employers will agree that CP graduates perform at an advanced level in their job.

 

3. Prepare graduates who can successfully compete for employment in the dietetic profession.

Expected Program Outcomes:

  1. a.     80% of students enrolled in the CP will complete the program requirements in 3 years
  2. b.     70% of CP graduates who seek employment in a dietetic related field will be employed within 3 months
  3. c.     80% of CP graduates taking the registration examination for the first time will receive a passing score

 

Outcome data measuring achievement of program objectives is available to students, prospective students, and the public upon request.

 

Facilities

 

Baptist Memorial Hospital– North Mississippi

Baptist Memorial Hospital – New Albany

Baptist Memorial Hospital – DeSoto

Methodist Healthcare (4 hospitals in Memphis)

North Mississippi Regional Center

Fresenius Medical Care North America

Lafayette School District

Oxford School District

Mississippi State Department of Health

National Food Service Management Institute

 

CP students successfully completing the program will be eligible to take the registration examination administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). Successful completion of the CP and the registration examination meet the requirements to be a Registered Dietitian (RD).

 

Admission Requirements

Requirements for Admission to the University of Mississippi Coordinated Program

  • You Must Be Admitted To The Master of Science in Food and Nutrition Services Graduate Program at the University of Mississippi to be considered as a candidate for the University of Mississippi Coordinated Program in Dietetics (CP).

 

  • The CP will accept students from different backgrounds.  Depending on the student’s background, one of the following two options will apply:

 

  1. Students with a verification statement from a Didactic Program in Dietetics who have been fully accepted into the M.S. in Food and Nutrition Services can apply to the CP by providing the following before the deadline of January 15:
  • Completed application to the CP (see application form)
  • Personal letter of application, maximum 2 pages, typed, 12 font.  Include how your academic and personal background influenced your decision to become a Registered Dietitian.
  • Statement of personal and professional goals
  • One written recommendation from teachers, employers, or supervisors.  This recommendation cannot be from one of the individuals that provided support for application to the M.S. program.

Application and letters of recommendation should be submitted to Melinda Valliant, 108 Sorority Row, Lenoir Hall room 222, University, MS 38677 before January 15.  Incomplete or late applications will NOT be considered.

Since CP students must be admitted to graduate school as part of the admission process, they must follow the university’s academic calendar. As part of the CP, these students will be enrolled in two semesters of course work prior to starting supervised practice. A typical schedule for a CP student is as follows:

Fall, Year 1                                          Spring, Year 1

Advanced Nutrition (3 hours)              Nutrition & Exercise in Health & Disease (3hrs)

Nutrition Education (3 hrs)                  Health Facilities Mgmt (3hrs)

Research design I (3 hours)               Research II (3 hours)

 

Summer, Year 1

Supervised Practice (3 hrs)

 

Fall, Year 2                                               Spring, Year 2

Supervised Practice (3 hrs)                       Supervised Practice (3 hrs)

Thesis or directed research                      Elective (3 hours)

 

Total required hours for completion of the CP are 36 with 9 of these being supervised practice.  A thesis is optional and may increase the student’s time to complete the CP from the planned 2 years.

  1. Students without a verification statement will be required to complete the following prerequisites or equivalent courses prior to applying to the coordinated program:
  • NHM 111 SERVSAFE or show SERVSAFE certification
  • NHM 211/213 Principles of Food Preparation/ Food Preparation Laboratory
  • NHM 311 Nutrition
  • NHM 410 Medical Nutrition Therapy I
  • NHM 461 Foodservice Systems Management
  • BISC 206 Anatomy and Physiology I (lecture and laboratory)
  • BICS 207 Anatomy and Physiology II (lecture and laboratory)
  • CHEM 105/115 General Chemistry I (lecture and laboratory)
  • CHEM 106/116 General Chemistry II (lecture and laboratory)
  • CHEM 221/225 Organic Chemistry
  • CHEM 271 Biochemistry

 

Students, who have completed the prerequisites and have been fully admitted to the M.S. in Food and Nutrition Services, may apply to the CP by providing the following before the deadline of July 1:

  • Completed application to the CP (see application form)
  • Personal letter of application, maximum 2 pages, typed, 12 font.  Include how your academic and personal background influenced your decision to become a Registered Dietitian.
  • Statement of personal and professional goals
  • One written recommendation from teachers, employers, or supervisors.  This recommendation cannot be from one of the individuals that provided support for application to the M.S. program.

Application and letters of recommendation should be submitted to Melinda Valliant, 108 Sorority Row, Lenoir Hall room 222, University, MS 38677 before May 1.  Incomplete or late applications will NOT be considered.

International Students

In order for an individual educated outside of the United States to become a Registered Dietitian, registered with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), they must first meet certain requirements different from US students. International students who wish to apply for a position in the University of Mississippi Coordinated program in Dietetics must first meet all requirements for an international student at the university.

Costs and Financial Aid

Estimated Expenses*

Tuition $283.50 per semester hour (resident)
Textbook/supplies Approximately $800
Professional needs Approximately $400
Travel to supervised practice sites Approximately $300
Professional Meetings Registration fees and travel costs vary

 

Financial Aid

Full-time graduate students are eligible for federally guaranteed student loans and other forms of financial assistance. Those interested in such assistance should contact the University of Mississippi office of Financial Aid at 1-800-891-4596 or at www.olemiss.edu/depts/financial_aid/.

In addition, scholarships are offered through the Department of NHM. Applications are available in the department office early in the year. Additional professional scholarships may be available through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation. Information these scholarships can be found at http://www.eatright.org/cps/rde/xchg/ada/hs.xsl/career_394_ENU_HTML.htm. Students must be a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to be eligible to apply for Foundation scholarships.

 

 

Policies and Procedures

As part of the Coordinated Program, the student is required to:

  1. Maintain admission to the graduate school throughout the program.
  2. Take all required courses.
  3. Have appropriate immunizations and ServSafe® certification prior to entering facilities.
  4. Be covered by malpractice liability insurance.
  5. Have transportation to and from the facility as well as any special assignments required by the program (e.g. home visits, etc.)
  6. Attend all required district, state and national meetings required by the program.
  7. Be responsible for their own housing.
  8. Be responsible for all medical expenses for treatment of on-the-job incurred injuries.
  9. Be responsible for following the administrate policies of the facility.
  10. Be responsible for providing the necessary and appropriate uniforms required, but not provided by the facility.
  11. Be responsible for reporting to the designated individual at the facility on time.

 

 

Equal Opportunity/Civil Rights and Disability

The Office of Equal Opportunity and Regulatory Compliance for The University of Mississippi (EO/RC) is responsible for the implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of the University’s Affirmative Action Program and to ensure compliance with all federal regulations.

EO/RC’s mission is to ensure the university’s compliance with federal regulations regarding fair treatment of faculty, staff, and students; to ensure equal employment opportunity and to ensure equal access to a quality education for students. EO/RC is also responsible for investigating complaints of discrimination and serves as a liaison between the university and federal enforcement agencies concerned with equal opportunity and non-discrimination.

If you need special assistance related to a disability, please contact or visit our office:

Access to Records

Coordinated Program students have the right to access any personal, academic or advisement records maintained by the CP Director.  Any student wishing to review his/her records should submit the request in writing to the CP Director and make an appointment to access the records.

Privacy of Information

The University of Mississippi Coordinated Program assumes the responsibility for protecting the privacy of educational records of individual interns.

3.8.1.1 Withdrawal and refund of tuition and fees.

The CP abides by the same policy as the University concerning withdrawal and refund of tuition and fees.  That policy is as follows:

RETURN OF FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID FUNDS WHEN STUDENTS OFFICIALLY OR UNOFFICIALLY WITHDRAW

Special rules apply when students withdraw after receiving student financial aid (SFA) for the term from any of the following programs:

• Federal Pell Grant
• Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
• Academic Competitiveness Grant
• TEACH Grant
• National SMART Grant
• Federal Perkins Loan
• Federal Stafford Subsidized and/or Unsubsidized Loan
• Federal Grad PLUS Loan (for graduate students)
• Federal PLUS Loan (for undergraduate students)
• Other Title IV programs

These rules are federally mandated. Before The University of Mississippi can calculate any tuition/fee refunds to a student under the institutional refund policy (see the Academic Calendar at www.olemiss.edu/depts/registrar/ for this policy, which is administered by the Office of the Bursar), the Office of Financial Aid must determine whether any financial aid funds should be paid back.

The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 define withdrawal as failure to complete the period of attendance on which federal aid eligibility was based. Therefore, this policy affects not only those individuals who complete the formal withdrawal notification process (as specified by the registrar), but also those students who simply stop attending classes. In either case, when a recipient of Title IV funds ceases attendance during a term, the university must calculate how much SFA was earned by the student.

A percentage is determined by the following formula:

Number of calendar days completed in the term as of the date of withdrawal

DIVIDED BY

Total number of calendar days in the term

If this percentage is more than 60 percent, no paybacks will be processed. For fall 2009, students who withdraw Oct. 23 or later will have completed at least 60 percent of the semester. (Please note: Some academic programs hold classes on a different calendar than the traditional term. If applicable, students may contact the Office of Financial Aid to determine the 60 percent point for their period of attendance.)

If the result is 60 percent or less, then this percentage is used to determine how much of the aid that was disbursed (or could have been disbursed) is considered earned. The remainder must be returned to the Title IV program(s). Return of funds is processed as outlined below.

SCHOOL
The university must return the lesser of (1) the amount of SFA not earned or (2) the institutional costs (tuition, housing, etc.) that the student incurred multiplied by the percentage of SFA not earned.

STUDENT
The student (or parent, in the case of a PLUS loan) must repay the amount of unearned SFA remaining after the university has returned its share.

ALLOCATION OF RETURNED FUNDS
Unearned funds are first applied (paid back) to any Title IV loans borrowed during the term. As stipulated by federal regulations, funds are returned in the following order:

Unsubsidized Stafford loan

Subsidized Stafford loan

Federal Perkins loan

Federal Grad PLUS loan (for graduate students)

Federal PLUS loans (for undergraduate students)

When the school must return loan funds to the lender on the student’s behalf (or parent’s, in the case of a PLUS loan), the student’s bursar account will be charged for this amount. When the federal calculation determines, instead, that it is the student’s (or parent’s) responsibility to return funds directly to the lender, the earned Title IV loan funds are repaid in accordance with the terms of the loan.

If unearned funds remain after all loans have been repaid, the remaining unearned funds must be credited to Title IV programs in the following order:

Federal Pell Grant

Academic Competitiveness Grant

National SMART Grant

Federal SEOG

TEACH Grant

When the school must return grant funds on the student’s behalf, the student’s bursar account will be charged for this amount. When the responsibility for repaying funds to the Title IV grant programs falls to the student, the student is required to return only 50 percent of the grant repayment as calculated using the federal formula. Grant overpayments may be collected according to arrangements satisfactory to the school, or by overpayment collection procedures prescribed by the Department of Education.

WITHDRAWAL DURING THE REFUND PERIOD
Withdrawals during the university’s refund period (during which tuition/fee refunds may apply), institutional aid that has credited to the student account must be repaid in full. Please refer to the Academic Calendar for the appropriate dates.

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY
A student can withdraw from the university during the course of a semester or summer term online at my.olemiss.edu, or he/she can provide written notification either via fax, mail or in person to the Office of the Registrar. Detailed information about the withdrawal process is provided in the Undergraduate Catalog. All students should be aware that withdrawing (either officially or unofficially) can adversely affect scholarships and grants (Academic Excellence, MTAG, etc.) for the next term of attendance. The Office of Financial Aid can provide guidance in those cases. Refund, repayment and withdrawal policies are subject to change, without notice, in order to comply with administrative and regulatory requirements.

UNOFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL
“Unofficial withdrawals” are defined as those students who simply stopped attending classes. These students never went through a formal process to withdraw but did not complete the period of attendance on which their federal aid eligibility was based. As noted in the Federal Student Financial Aid Handbook, the Department of Education mandates that universities develop a mechanism for determining whether a student who is a recipient of Title IV grant or loan funds has ceased attendance without notification during the period of enrollment.

To meet this requirement, the Office of Financial Aid has created a term-based report that identifies all students who received federal aid and posted all “F” and/or “W” grades. Each student is notified by letter, and an e-mail is sent to his/her university e-mail account that it has been determined that he/she may be an unofficial withdrawal, and, as a result, federal financial aid paybacks will be issued. The letter/e-mail informs the student of his/her right to dispute the determination. For students falling into these categories, we must determine if they actually began attendance and, if so, when the attendance ceased. Once we have that information, these students are processed as schedule cancellations (if never attended) or as unofficial withdrawals (if attended and left without officially withdrawing). For schedule cancellations, the student account will be charged for all disbursed aid so that it can be returned to the source. For unofficial withdrawals, an unofficial withdrawal calculation is performed for refund purposes.

Each student is responsible for having class instructors contact the Office of Financial Aid with a last date of attendance or class-related activity by the accounts receivable posting date that is shown in the student’s Unofficial Withdrawal letter. If acceptable documentation is provided, the later date will be used for the unofficial withdrawal calculation.

 

3.8.1.2 Scheduling and program calendar, including vacation and holidays

 

Students will begin supervised practice during the May intersession as scheduled by the University. After completion of intersession, students will report to their assigned facility as outlines in their rotation schedule.  The length of the supervised practice component allows for students to have holidays on Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, a two week winter from on or about December 20 until January 3.  Students will have 10 additional days during which they are to arrange a schedule holiday with their primary preceptor and notify the CP Director of the approved time off.  These days off are to be used should opportunities for employment interviews arise.

 

3.8.1.3 Protection of privacy of student information

 

The University of Mississippi Coordinated Program assumes the responsibility for protecting the privacy of educational records of individual interns.

 

3.8.1.4 Access to personal files

 

Coordinated Program students have the right to access any personal, academic or advisement records maintained by the CP Director.  Any student wishing to review his/her records should submit the request in writing to the CP Director and make an appointment to access the records.

 

3.8.1.5 Access to student support services, including health services, counseling and testing and financial aid resource

 

The University of Mississippi

Eligibility for Student Health Service

Summary/Purpose: To define Student Health Service care eligibility. Eligibility for Student Health Service care is available to all currently enrolled students at the University of Mississippi, Oxford Campus. Students also are eligible for services between semesters if they completed the previous semester and are enrolled in the next fall or spring semester.

 

Student Health Service Fees

Summary/Purpose: To establish the fees charged to students for services at the Student Health Service. The Student Health Service strives to maintain fees at a reasonable level to avoid creating a financial barrier for patients. There is no fee for visits for acute care, education, or counseling. Fees are divided into special visit fees and ancillary service fees.

Special Visit Fees

A minimal charge for visits will be made to students who are not presently enrolled but who have completed the previous semester and plan to enroll the next semester. A visit charge will be made for performing physical examinations and completing forms. Visit fees for special program participants are by arrangement with the Student Health Service.

Ancillary Service Fees

Fees are charged for laboratory, X-ray, procedures, and supplies.

Filing of Insurance Claims Insurance will be filed at the patient’s request. Insurance plans will be instructed to pay benefits to the policyholder. If the insurance plan pays Student Health Service, we will credit the student’s bursar account. Please note that filing an insurance claim does not guarantee that benefits will be paid.

 

Counseling Center Fees

Summary/Purpose: To establish the fees assessed for services at the University Counseling Center.

Counseling services are free to eligible students and employees. Fees for additional services such as court ordered programs, alcohol and drug assessment, etc., may be assessed. Clients will be informed of any charges before services are provided.

 

Awarding Financial Aid

Summary/Purpose: The awarding of financial aid.

To be awarded any financial aid, a student must be admitted to the University.

Federal Title IV Aid

Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Academic Competitiveness

Grant, SMART Grant, Work Study, Stafford Loans and Perkins Loans

To be awarded federal Title IV Aid, a student must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and meet all eligibility requirements. Federal aid for the upcoming academic year will be awarded beginning in April. Federal aid will continue to be awarded until appropriate deadlines are reached or funds are exhausted. The academic year begins with the Fall Semester and ends with the August Intersession. Summer financial aid is based on the FAFSA used for the prior academic year and must be filed with the Federal Processor by the June 30 deadline. (For summer 2009, Pell may be awarded as a header to the 2009-2010 year if an eligible ISIR has been received.)

PLUS Loans

A FAFSA must be filed before a Parent PLUS Loan or Graduate PLUS Loan will be certified and students must meet all other eligibility requirements. These loans are borrower-initiated with a lender. Following credit approval, the lender will then notify the University electronically of the pending certification. Once the loan is certified, it will be added to the student’s award package.

Institutional Scholarships

For institutional scholarships, the following applies:

• If the student withdraws from the University within the 100% institutional refund period, all scholarships that have credited to the student’s bursar account must be repaid.

• A fee specific scholarship will only pay if a student is charged that specific fee.

Although it is possible to have more than one fee-specific scholarship targeting the same fee, the combination of credits from these scholarships cannot exceed the amount of that fee.

• Scholarships paid from Mississippi Educational & General Fund may not exceed a student’s estimated cost of attendance less other financial aid and resources. If the cost of attendance is exceeded, the scholarship may be subject to reduction.

University Scholarships

Academic Excellence Scholarships and the Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship are awarded to incoming freshmen students and incoming community college transfer students, respectively. Students must be admitted and are awarded on a funds available basis based on academic credentials. Awarding typically begins in January.

University Foundation Scholarships

Most University Foundation scholarships are awarded to incoming freshmen students and/or to incoming community college transfer students. To be eligible, these students must be admitted. In addition, incoming freshman students should file the Entering Freshman Scholarship Application by the deadline of February 1 prior to the academic year in which they will first enroll; for full consideration, students should file by the priority date of February 1. Some University Foundation scholarships require additional applications and documentation. Awarding begins mid-February. These scholarships are selected by various committees.

College, School, Departmental, or Office Scholarships

Most college, school, departmental, or office scholarships are manually awarded and will be added to the financial aid package upon receipt of the information via the on-line departmental scholarship submission form from the awarding department. Many of the colleges, schools, and departments require their own applications and supporting documentation and have their own deadlines.

Agency Banked Hours are awarded by the School of Education for participating agencies. These awards are subject to the agency’s fund allocation.

Child of Faculty and/or Staff Full or Partial Tuition Scholarship

To be considered for this scholarship, the student must download from the Office of Financial Aid web page the application, complete it, and submit it to the Office of Financial Aid. The Office of Human Resources will determine eligibility. This application needs to be submitted only once; an annual renewal is not required. This scholarship is available during the winter intersession and summer terms as well.

Nonresident Partial Tuition Scholarship for a Child of Alumni Parent and/or Stepparent

To be considered for this scholarship, the student must download from the Office of Financial Aid web page the application, complete it, and submit it to the Office of Financial Aid. The Office of the Registrar will determine eligibility. This application needs to be submitted only once; an annual renewal is not required. The Office of Financial Aid will continue awards in future terms if all GPA and enrollment requirements are met. This scholarship is available during the summer term as well.

Sumners Grant

To be considered for the Sumners Grant, the student must complete and submit the application electronically on the Office of Financial Aid web page. This application must be completed each year and students must meet each of following requirements:

1. Be a resident of Attala, Carroll, Choctaw, Montgomery, or Webster County in Mississippi.

2. Have resided for 12 continuous months in one of the five Sumners counties prior to enrollment. Independent students who have not established a residence in one of the Sumners counties cannot establish eligibility using the address of parents who reside in one of the eligible counties. The Sumners Foundation determines residency eligibility annually.

3. Be enrolled in a degree program at the institution. Teacher certification courses may also be approved (except for visiting students) if documented as such by the School of Education.

4. Be making financial aid satisfactory academic progress.

Miscellaneous Scholarships and Other Outside Awards

Miscellaneous scholarships and other outside awards are those scholarships, grants, and awards that are managed and awarded to the student by a source that is outside of the University. The student is required to report all outside resources to the Office of Financial Aid. These resources include all scholarships, loans, and/or other funds that are paid directly to the student or to the University on the student’s behalf. If the award is to be paid to the University on the student’s behalf, students should bring, send, or have sent these funds to the Office of Financial Aid. The resource amount will then be added to the student’s award package, which then will disburse to the student’s bursar account in the same fashion that other aid disburses. Aid will not be disbursed until receipt of the funds by the Office of Financial Aid. The Office of Financial Aid assumes that any Miscellaneous Scholarship checks received on the student’s behalf are funds to be used for the academic year (i.e. split between terms) unless our office is told otherwise by the donor.

Estimated Aid

All estimated aid is self-reported and/or unofficial aid. To qualify for this estimated aid, a student must complete all of the requirements directly with the awarding sources. After the Office of Financial Aid receives the funds, the aid will be disbursed to the student’s bursar account.

Estimated MTAG/MESG or Other Estimated State Aid Programs

Estimated MTAG/MESG or any other state aid program is unofficial aid until confirmed by the State of Mississippi’s Office of Student Financial Aid in Jackson. The student must apply with the State of Mississippi’s Office of Student Financial Aid, and this application must be completed annually. Eligibility is determined by the State of Mississippi’s Office of Student Financial Aid.

MTAG may be prorated subject to funds availability or other awards that are received.

Private (Alternative) Loans

These loans are borrower-initiated via the appropriate Office of Financial Aid web page and will be added to the award package once the loan(s) have been certified.

Summer Financial Aid

In addition to meeting all other aid requirements, to be awarded any type of summer financial aid, the student must complete the Summer Financial Aid Award application. The Summer Financial Aid Award application is on-line from mid-March to mid-August. After the Summer Financial Aid Award application has been submitted, the financial aid for which the student is eligible will be awarded.

 

3.8.2 Additional policies and procedures specific to the CP and supervised practice component are provided to students in a CP handbook on a timely basis.

 

Students will be provided a student handbook at the graduate student orientation prior to the beginning of the fall semester.  Students will receive both the M.S. and CP handbooks. In addition, this information will be available on the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences website.  The handbook will include the policies listed in 3.8.1 and 3.8.2 as well as additional policies included after 3.8.2.12

 

3.8.2.1 Insurance requirements, including those for professional liability

Proof of Health Insurance

 

Students participating in the CP must show evidence of medical insurance coverage.  Proof of medical insurance coverage must be presented to the CP Director prior to assignment in any supervised practice facility.  This is critical because students are not employees of these operations and thus are not covered by Worker’ Compensation.

Professional and General Liability Insurance

It is a requirement that students who have been admitted to the CP carry professional liability insurance to protect them from malpractice suits.  Proof of student liability coverage must be presented to the CP Director prior to assignment in any supervised practice facility.

The company we recommend is he Marsh Affinity Group Services, a service of Seabury and Smith.  This company is recommended by ADA.  To enroll, apply online at www.proliability.com.

 

1.  Choose profession—click and select Student

2.  Choose your association—scroll down and select American Dietetic Association

3.  Click instant quote

4.  Complete the following information:

Certificate Information:

Effective date: __/__/__ (date you plan to begin supervised practice)

Promo Code: Association

Employment Information:

Practice Type: Student

State of Practice—Mississippi (you will also be covered for other states i.e. Tennessee)

5.Click continue

6. Complete the following information:

Employee Information

Occupation: Student Dietitian

7.Click continue

8. Choose one of the 2 options: 2,000,000 per incident/5,000,000 aggregrate for $24.00 OR 1,000,000 per incident/5,000,000 aggregrate for $20.00

9.Click continue

10.Complete the Personal Information Section

Be sure to type The University of Mississippi in the last box

11.Click continue

12.Fill in your credit card information (visa or mastercard)

13.Click continue

14.Print any information that you are asked to print

 

3.8.2.2 Liability for Safety in Travel

 

Students must assume responsibility for transportation to and from off-campus activities such as supervised practice assignments, travel to professional meetings and field trips.  During the entire second year of the CP, students will be assigned to off-campus facilities.  It is highly recommended that students have reliable transportation of their own by this time.

 

3.8.2.3 Injury or illness while in a facility for supervised practice

 

Students are responsible for having adequate health insurance coverage to cover any injury incurred while at a facility.  Since the student is not an employee of the facility, Workman’s Compensation coverage will not apply.

 

3.8.2.4 Drug testing and criminal background checks

 

Students will have drug screening, TB skin testing and criminal background check completed during the second week of orientation by employee health at the North Mississippi Regional Center.  These procedures will be completed at no cost to the student and results will be given to the CP Director to share with other facilities.

 

3.8.2.5 Educational purpose of supervised practice to prevent the use of students to replace employees

 

Students in the CP work under the guidance of a preceptor to fulfill specific curriculum objectives for each rotation.  At no time, including the staff relief component, are they

considered employees.

 

3.8.2.6 Filing and handling complaints from students and preceptors that includes recourse to an administrator other than the CP Director and prevents retaliation

 

 

Grievance Procedure: Coordinated Program

 

PURPOSE:  To state policy, responsibility and procedures for processes grievances of Coordinated Program students.

 

POLICY:

 

  1. All preceptors are to provide full and fair consideration to complaints.

 

  1. All grievances are to be handled promptly and fairly.

 

  1. Path of Grievance

 

  1. Preceptor

 

  1. Primary Preceptor

 

  1. Coordinated Program Director

 

PROCEDURE:

 

  1. Step 1.  The student will present the grievance in writing, to the appropriate preceptor, within ten days of the date of the incident or circumstance.  The dietitian involved will provide a written answer to the Coordinated Program student within ten days from the date of the receipt of the grievance, or the student will be informed of the reasons for the delay.

 

  1. Steps 2 through 5.  If the grievance is not satisfactorily resolved at Step 1, the student may present the grievance in writing to the next management level per grievance path (B-C).  The written grievance must state, in detail, the basis for the grievance and the corrective action desired.  At each step, the student has 10 days from date of receipt of decision to file a progressive grievance and 10 days are allowed for a written response.

 

  1. A grievance may be initiated at a higher management level if the student is unable to discuss the grievance with the preceptor involved.

 

RESPONSIBILITY:

 

Coordinated Program Student

 

  1. To discuss grievance with preceptor involved.

 

  1. To discuss grievance with Coordinated Program Director when unable to discuss with preceptor involved and/or is not satisfied with decision rendered.

 

  1. To submit grievance, in writing, if grievance is to be taken to the next level (Primary Preceptor, Coordinated Program Director).

 

Preceptor

 

  1. To discuss and solve grievance within scope of authority.

 

  1. To give the Coordinated Program student an answer, in writing, within 10 days from the date of receipt of the grievance.

 

  1. To communicate the grievance to the Coordinated Program Director and/or Primary Preceptor.

 

Primary Preceptor

 

  1. To review the grievance procedure with the responsible preceptor and make recommendations for resolving the grievance.

 

  1. To inform the Coordinated Program Director of the process, procedure and proposed resolution of grievance.

 

  1. Coordinated Program Director

 

  1. To assist, guide and direct the preceptor and others on the procedure for resolving the grievance.

 

  1. To meet and discuss grievance with student when it reaches that level and to render a decision within 10 days.

 

  1. To keep the primary preceptor informed.

 

 

Melinda Valliant, PhD, RD, LD

Coordinated Program Director

 

 

3.8.2.7 Assessment of prior learning and credit toward program requirements (coursework and/or experimental)

 

As outlined in the Policies and Procedures for the M.S. in Food and Nutrition Services a maximum of 6 hours of graduate coursework may be approved for transfer as determined by the Graduate Program Committee.  No supervised practice hours will be accepted for transfer into the CP.

 

3.8.2.8 Formal assessment of student learning and regular reports of performance and progress at specified intervals throughout the CP, such as within and at the conclusion of any given course, unit, segment or rotation of a planned learning experience.

 

Performance evaluations are completed by preceptors and reviewed with CP students at the conclusion of each supervised practice rotation.  If deemed necessary by the preceptor, informal evaluations are completed on a more frequent basis.  Students complete self-assessments at the conclusion of each rotation.  The CP Director meets quarterly with each student to review performance.

 

Some assignments are evaluated as they occur in the program.  Results are share with the student immediately.  Performance on these assignments may be a part of the formal evaluation.

 

The CP Director writes summative evaluations of each student based on the formal evaluations completed by preceptors throughout the year.  These summative evaluations the only documents kept on file and can be used when a prospective employer requests a reference.

 

 

3.8.2.9 CP retention and remediation procedures when student performance does not meet criteria for progressing in the program

 

The CP will follow the University’s policy as outlined below for the graduate students.  In addition, the CP has written policies and procedures on the grievance procedure; probation and dismissal from the supervised practice component (see policies that follow)

 

Policy on the Dismissal or Change in Status of Graduate

Students

This policy describes the conditions and procedures, including appeals procedures, for the dismissal or change in admission status of a degree-seeking graduate student. A sanction of dismissal or expulsion, among other possible sanctions, may also result from academic discipline, non-academic discipline, or research misconduct proceedings. The policy below applies to students who are not meeting academic expectations and/or professional expectations within the degree program.

Good Standing, Probation, And Dismissal Or Change In Status Based Upon Failure To Meet Academic Performance Expectations On Degree Course Work: A graduate student must have a 3.0 gpa on all course work that is presented toward completion of a degree. A student is in good standing with respect to registration for an upcoming semester if he or she makes a 3.0 gpa on course work for the preceding Fall or Spring regular semester. A student whose grade point average is less than 3.0 for any regular semester will be placed on probation, and a dean’s registration hold will be applied to the student’s record. Such a student will not be allowed to register unless the academic department/program makes an affirmative recommendation to the Graduate Dean, who will then temporarily lift the hold. Without a written, favorable recommendation from the chair or graduate program coordinator of a department/program, a student on probation will be converted to an inactive status and must re-apply and be re-admitted to the graduate program in order to continue in the same or other program.

In addition, a student may be dismissed from a graduate program or have his or her admission status changed (e.g., from full-standing to conditional or non-degree seeking) if the student fails to meet specific course requirements of the department/program. These course requirements may have been specified for an individual student or may involve required grades in “core” courses. Ordinarily, these course expectations should be made known to the student before enrollment. In some circumstances, however, an appropriate faculty group, which may be the student’s advisory committee or the graduate education committee of a department/program, may require additional course work based upon the student’s performance in the program or failure to timely progress towards a degree.

If in the judgment of the appropriate faculty group a student fails to satisfy specific course or program requirements in a timely manner, the faculty group may recommend dismissal from a graduate program or change of status. This recommendation shall be forwarded by the graduate program coordinator or department chair to the Graduate Dean and to the affected student with an indication whether the chair or program coordinator concurs with the faculty recommendation. The Graduate Dean will act on the faculty recommendation and inform the student and the graduate program coordinator or department chair of the action taken. The decision of the Graduate Dean with respect to the faculty recommendation is not subject to appeal. Ordinarily, dismissal or change of status for failure to meet specific course requirements would take effect between semesters or enrollment periods. If a student is dismissed from a graduate program, he or she will be considered a non-degree II student and may re-apply to a graduate program.

Dismissal Or Change In Status Based Upon Failure To Meet Non-Course Work Academic Performance Expectations: In addition to graded courses, a graduate student is expected to pass examinations and perform research or other creative activities. A student may be dismissed from a graduate program if he or she fails to meet such expectations of the program. Departments/programs may establish non-course related academic performance expectations, such as whether or not a comprehensive examination may be repeated or timelines for research accomplishment or the successful completion of examinations. The advisor, graduate program coordinator, or department chair must provide reasonable warning to the student, in writing, about academic performance deficiencies. Typically, these warnings would occur as part of a periodic review process for students in the program. An appropriate faculty group, which may be the student’s advisory committee or the graduate education committee of a department/program, may recommend dismissal or change in the admission status of a student. This recommendation shall be forwarded by the graduate program coordinator or department chair to the Graduate Dean and to the affected student with an indication whether the chair or program coordinator concurs with the faculty recommendation. The Graduate Dean will act on the faculty recommendation and inform the student and the graduate program coordinator or department chair of the action taken. Ordinarily, dismissal or change of status for failure to meet non-course work academic performance expectations would take effect between semesters or enrollment periods. If a student is dismissed from a graduate program, he or she will be considered a non-degree II student and may re-apply to a graduate program.

The Graduate School has also established time limitations for master’s, specialist, and doctoral degree programs. Students who do not complete degree requirements within the established time limits will be changed to non-degree seeking II status.

Dismissal Or Change In Status Based Upon Failure To Meet Professional, Ethical, And Behavioral Expectations: Graduate students are also expected to behave in a collegial manner and to adhere to the professional and ethical standards of the discipline. Students are expected to develop collaborative and collegial relationships with and to work with graduate faculty, students, and other professionals in research, academic, or professional settings. If in the judgment of the appropriate faculty group a student fails to meet the above expectations, or otherwise fails to act in ways that are consistent with the norms and standards of the profession or discipline, an appropriate faculty group may recommend dismissal or change in the admission status of that graduate student. This recommendation shall be forwarded by the graduate program coordinator or department chair to the Graduate Dean and to the affected student, with an indication whether the chair or program coordinator concurs with the faculty recommendation. The Graduate Dean will act on the faculty recommendation and inform the student and the graduate program coordinator or department chair of the action taken. Ordinarily, if a student is dismissed from a graduate program for the above reasons, he or she will be considered a non-degree II student and may re-apply to a graduate program. The judgment of the Graduate Dean may be to prohibit the individual from re-applying to some programs.

.

Related Procedures: This policy complements the University’s policies on Student Academic Conduct and Discipline (ACA.AR.600.001), Grade Appeals (ACA.AR.600.002), the Appeal of a Comprehensive Examination (ACA.GS.400.003), and the Student Judicial (Non-Academic Discipline) process (DSL.SJ.100.001).

Appeals Procedure: The appeals procedure outlined below applies to dismissal and change in admission status cases involving failure to meet non-course work academic performance expectations and failure to meet professional and ethical expectations. The procedure does not apply to grade-based holds and dismissals, changes in status due to violation of time limitations, grade appeals for individual courses, academic misconduct or charges that are brought through the student judicial process. In the case of comprehensive examinations, the appeals process for the examination outcome initially follows a separate process. (See Appeal of a Comprehensive Examination (ACA.GS.400.003).) If the outcome of the examination appeal results in a dismissal or change in admission status, then the student may appeal as set forth herein.

An appeal must be based on evidence that the recommendation of the appropriate faculty group and/or the decision of the Graduate Dean were based on prejudice, discrimination, arbitrary or capricious action, or other reasons not related to academic or professional performance. There is a presumption that the faculty group and the Graduate Dean have acted with professional competence, and, in the absence of convincing evidence to the contrary, have evaluated the student fairly.

The steps for the appeal are as follows:

Step 1. Appeal to a Graduate Student Appeals Committee: Either the student, the graduate program coordinator, department chair, or graduate faculty member from the program may appeal the decision of the Graduate Dean within 15 days of receiving notice of the Graduate Dean’s decision by submitting a written request to the Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. The Graduate Dean and, as applicable, the student or the graduate program coordinator or department chair must be provided a copy of the appeal request. The written request for an appeal must state the factual basis for the appeal of the Dean’s decision. This appeal request is the primary document setting forth the contention by either the student or faculty that the decision by the Dean of the

Graduate School should be reversed. Upon receiving a request for an appeal at this level, the Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs will appoint an ad hoc Graduate Student Appeals Committee. This Committee will include: an at-large graduate faculty member who will chair the committee; three graduate faculty members, two of whom must be from the department involved; and three graduate students nominated by the Graduate Student Council leadership. The chair of this committee will first appoint a three-person sub-committee to review all written documents associated with the case to determine if a formal hearing is warranted. If, in the opinion of the subcommittee, a formal hearing is not warranted, the Graduate Student Appeals Committee may make its recommendation based upon written evidence submitted by the student, the faculty, and the Graduate Dean.

If the subcommittee finds that the student’s (or faculty member’s) request merits a formal hearing before the entire committee, the chair of the committee shall notify all parties (student, department chair, graduate program coordinator, involved faculty, and Graduate Dean) in writing of the time and location of the hearing.

The purpose of the hearing is to elicit information on which the committee may base a recommendation to the Provost/Vice Chancellor for action. It is not to be construed as a trial in a court of law. The rules of evidence shall not apply to the hearing, and the committee may base its recommendation on the sorts of information upon which institutions typically rely in making academic judgments. The hearing shall be closed.

Both student and involved faculty may provide any written materials they desire, and the committee may request additional material if it deems such necessary. Both the student and faculty concerned shall be afforded the right to present witnesses or other evidence, question opposing witnesses, and make a concluding statement. No attorneys shall be permitted to represent participants. When the committee has reviewed all documents and heard such testimony as it considers necessary to reach a conclusion, it shall adopt by majority vote its recommendation to the Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs.

The chair of the committee shall send copies of the committee’s recommendation to the Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, student, department chair or graduate program coordinator, involved faculty, and Dean of the Graduate School.

Step 2. Final Decision by Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs: The Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs shall make the final decision, utilizing any resources to assist in deciding the appeal. The Provost/Vice Chancellor shall have the right to allow the dismissal or change in admissions status to stand or to change the decision of the Graduate Dean. He/she shall inform all parties involved, including the Appeals Committee members, of his/her final decision on the matter.

If a student appeals a dismissal decision, the student may petition the Dean for permission to enroll in a course pending appeal. The Graduate Dean may, in his/her sole discretion, determine if a student may enroll pending appeal. However, if the appeal is denied, then the student will be dropped from all courses that relate to the case, and relevant refund policies will apply.

Inactive Students or Admission-Denied Applicants: Individuals who were UM students at one time and have been converted to an inactive status and applicants who were denied admission have no guaranteed right to the above appeals procedure. Students who are inactive for one regular semester must submit an application for readmission.

Unless expelled from the University, an individual who has been formally dismissed from a graduate program may apply to another graduate program within the University.

 

Grievance Procedure: Coordinated Program

 

PURPOSE:  To state policy, responsibility and procedures for processes grievances of Coordinated Program students.

POLICY:

  1. All preceptors are to provide full and fair consideration to complaints.

 

  1. All grievances are to be handled promptly and fairly.

 

  1. Path of Grievance

 

  1. Preceptor

 

  1. Primary Preceptor

 

  1. Coordinated Program Director

 

PROCEDURE:

 

Step 1.  The student will present the grievance in writing, to the appropriate preceptor, within ten days of the date of the incident or circumstance.  The dietitian involved will provide a written answer to the Coordinated Program student within ten days from the date of the receipt of the grievance, or the student will be informed of the reasons for the delay.

 

Steps 2 through 5.  If the grievance is not satisfactorily resolved at Step 1, the student may present the grievance in writing to the next management level per grievance path (B-C).  The written grievance must state, in detail, the basis for the grievance and the corrective action desired.  At each step, the student has 10 days from date of receipt of decision to file a progressive grievance and 10 days are allowed for a written response.

 

A grievance may be initiated at a higher management level if the student is unable to discuss the grievance with the preceptor involved.

 

RESPONSIBILITY:

 

Coordinated Program Student

 

  1. To discuss grievance with preceptor involved.

 

  1. To discuss grievance with Coordinated Program Director when unable to discuss with preceptor involved and/or is not satisfied with decision rendered.

 

  1. To submit grievance, in writing, if grievance is to be taken to the next level (Primary Preceptor, Coordinated Program Director).

 

Preceptor

 

  1. To discuss and solve grievance within scope of authority.

 

  1. To give the Coordinated Program student an answer, in writing, within 10 days from the date of receipt of the grievance.

 

  1. To communicate the grievance to the Coordinated Program Director and/or Primary Preceptor.

 

Primary Preceptor

 

  1. To review the grievance procedure with the responsible preceptor and make recommendations for resolving the grievance.

 

  1. To inform the Coordinated Program Director of the process, procedure and proposed resolution of grievance.

 

  1. Coordinated Program Director

 

  1. To assist, guide and direct the preceptor and others on the procedure for resolving the grievance.

 

  1. To meet and discuss grievance with student when it reaches that level and to render a decision within 10 days.

 

  1. To keep the primary preceptor informed.

 

Melinda Valliant, PhD, RD, LD

Coordinated Program Director

 

Probation

 

PURPOSE:  To identify a probation procedure during the Coordinated Program for students.

 

POLICY:  The Coordinated Program student will be placed on probation after evaluations indicate unsatisfactory performance in two supervised practice rotations.

 

PROCEDURE:

 

  1. The Coordinated Program student is entitled to receive frequent and on-going evaluations throughout the supervised practice.  An informal evaluation should be given at the midpoint of each clinical rotation by the preceptor.  The informal evaluation may be oral.  Weaknesses should be identified and strong points emphasized.

 

  1. The Coordinated Program student will receive a formal written evaluation by the preceptor at the completion of each supervised practice rotation.  A quarterly conference with the student will be conducted by the Coordinated Program Director to review progress in the Coordinated Program.

 

  1. The student will complete a self-evaluation at the conclusion of each supervised practice rotation.  The student may discuss the self-evaluation with the preceptor in which case the preceptor will initial the self-evaluation.  The self-evaluation will be routed to the Coordinated Program Director through the primary preceptor.

 

  1. Following two supervised practice rotations where either the personal work skills and/or competency evaluations indicate unsatisfactory performance, the student will be formally counseled by the Coordinated Program Director, and those areas which do not meet established competencies will be identified.  A record of the counseling will be maintained.  At this time the student will be placed on probation.  A letter documenting counseling and probation will be given to the student.  The student will sign for receipt of the letter.  If the student is unavailable, the letter will be sent by certified mail.  One copy will be retained in the student’s file.

 

  1. The probation period will not exceed four weeks.  The student will be removed from probation when there is evidence of an acceptable level of performance.  If a satisfactory level of performance is not evident following the probation period, the student will be notified by certified mail of proposed dismissal from the supervised practice.  The student will be permitted only one probationary period during the supervised practice.

 

  1. A satisfactory level of performance is defined as an overall rating of three or more on the Evaluation of Supervised Practice.

 

 

Melinda Valliant, PhD, RD, LD

Coordinated Program Director

 

Dismissal from the Coordinated Program

 

PURPOSE:  To state the procedure for dismissal of the Coordinated Program student from the Coordinated Program.

 

POLICY:  A hearing will be scheduled for determination of the dismissal of a Coordinated Program student when the student has performed less than satisfactorily during or following a probation period.

 

PROCEDURE:

 

  1. The Coordinated Program student will be given a written statement by the Coordinated Program Director that she/he is being considered for dismissal at least 10 days prior to a hearing.

 

  1. The Coordinated Program student will be allowed to inspect her/his file in the office of the Coordinated Program Director, including all material upon which the proposed dismissal is based.

 

  1. The Coordinated Program student will be permitted to have counsel present at the hearing.

 

  1. The hearing board shall consist of the primary preceptors, Coordinated Program Director and a representative from the Graduate Council.

 

  1. The Coordinated Program student will be given the opportunity to present his/her case for remaining in the Coordinated Program, using any relevant evidence including affidavits, exhibits, and/or oral testimony.

 

  1. The Coordinated Program student will be presented with all evidence of her/his performance, including the reports and evaluations used in determining the performance level.

 

  1. The Coordinated Program student will be given the opportunity to question any witness who presents evidence against her/him at the hearing.

 

  1. Any recommendation for the dismissal of the Coordinated Program student from the program will be based solely upon the evidence presented at the hearing.

 

  1. The findings, decision by the hearing board and disposition of the case will be stated in writing by the Coordinated Program and a copy will be provided to the Coordinated Program student.

 

Melinda Valliant, PhD, RD, LD

Coordinated Program Director

 

 

 

3.8.2.10 Disciplinary/termination procedures

See 3.8.2.9

 

3.8.2.11 Graduation and/or CP completion requirements for all options including maximum time allowed to complete CP requirements in place at time student enrolls

 

Coordinated Program students are required to adequately complete all graduate coursework and supervised practice rotations while remaining in satisfactory status throughout the CP. This requires the student to maintain a 3.0 grade point average in coursework and score a 3 or higher on preceptor evaluations at the end of each rotation. In accordance with the University’s policy, the maximum amount of time to complete degree requirements for the Coordinated Program is six years.

 

3.8.2.12 Verification statement procedures ensuring that all students completing requirements as established by the CP receive verifications statements and are submitted to CDR for eligibility for the RD examination

 

A Verification Statement will be issued to each student by the CP Director upon successful completion of the CP.  This will establish that the student has completed requirements for eligibility to take the Registration Examination for Dietitians.

In addition to the policies included previously, the CP handbook includes the following:

 

Illness and Emergency Leave

 

PURPOSE:  To describe the policy/procedure for requesting leave for illness or an emergency.

 

POLICY:  Time off for illness and/or emergency will be granted for a maximum of five days  during the Coordinated Program.

 

RESPONSIBILITY:  The Coordinated Program Director approves requests for all leave.

 

PROCEDURE:

 

  1. When the coordinated student is ill, he/she is responsible for informing:
    1. Preceptor dietitian at the beginning of the tour of duty.
    2. Coordinated Program Director.

 

  1. Absence due to illness in excess of five days must be made up on Saturday and/or Sunday.  In addition, for illnesses of three consecutive days or more, verification of the illness (doctor’s certificate) may be required.

 

  1. Appointments for medical care of a non-emergency nature are not to be made during the tour of duty.  If it is necessary to make an appointment during the tour of duty, the time will be made up.

 

  1. Coordinated Program students will be required to make up any unexcused absence.

 

  1. Time off will be granted to attend funeral services for immediate family members (father, mother, brother, sister, spouse).  Time off in excess of three days will be made up on Saturday and/or Sunday.

 

  1. Assignments and activities not completed by a Coordinated Program student due to absences will be rescheduled and must be completed at the discretion of the preceptor if the absence has interfered with successful completion of the experience objectives.

 

  1. Make-up time will be scheduled by the Coordinated Program Director in consultation with the appropriate preceptor dietitian.

 

Melinda Valliant, PhD, RD, LD

Coordinated Program Director

Uniform and Dress Code for Coordinated Program Students

 

PURPOSE:  To define proper attire in supervised practice work areas; to guide Coordinated Program students as they develop personal standards for professional attire; to make Coordinated Program students aware of the fact that their dress may have an impact on their interactions with professional and non-professional personnel and patients.

 

POLICY:  The following guidelines are set forth to maintain standards of sanitation and safety in supervised practice work areas and to aid Coordinated Program students in the transition in dress from that of a student to that of a health professional.

 

RESPONSIBILITY:  The Coordinated Program Director will reinforce the dress code policy during orientation.  The Coordinated Program Director will counsel Coordinated Program students who do not comply with the Uniform and Dress Code.

 

PROCEDURE:

 

  1. Each Coordinated Program student’s personal appearance should exemplify professionalism, competence, and moderation.  The selection of clothing and accessories for the work environment should promote confidence and not draw undue attention to any individual because of their attire.

 

  1. A white laboratory jacket is the prescribed uniform for Coordinated Program students.  Clothing which is sheer, revealing and/or tightly fitted should not be worn.  Clothing with “slogans” is not permitted.  Conservative clothing (described below) is to be worn under the jacket.

 

  1. Female Attire – Women wear dresses, skirts, and blouses or dress slacks.  Short skirts (more than three inches above the knee), skorts, low necklines, T-shirts, midriff blouses, halter-tops, camisoles, sundresses, and jeans are not permitted.

 

  1. Male Attire – Men will wear dress or casual slacks.  Shirts may be dress or conservative sport.  Ties are recommended when in clinical and community rotations.  T-shirts, mesh shirts, and jeans of any variety are not permitted.

 

  1. Hair should be neatly styled and controlled.  Hair coverings or nets and/or beard guards are required when working in food production areas and will be supplied by the facility’s food service department.

 

  1. Shoes should be clean, comfortable and in good repair.  Canvas shoes, sandals and open-toed shoes are not permitted when working in food production areas.  Open-toed dress sandals are inappropriate in patient care areas.

 

  1. Jewelry should be kept to a minimum.  Avoid dangling earrings, bracelets, necklaces and rings.  Pierced jewelry, other than earrings, may not be worn.

 

  1. Fingernails should be clean and neatly manicured.  Nail polish may not be worn when assigned to food production areas.  Long fingernails are not permitted.  Artificial nails or extenders are not permitted.  This includes overlays, acrylics, wraps, etc.

 

  1. Excessive use of cosmetics, perfume/fragrances that may cause allergic reactions or discomfort to patients or other staff members should be avoided.

 

  1. An identification badge, issued by each facility, must be worn above the waist at all times.

 

 

 

Melinda Valliant, PhD, RD, LD

Coordinated Program Director

 

Vacation and Holidays

 

PURPOSE:  To specify planned vacation days and holidays for Coordinated Program students.

 

POLICY:  Fourteen vacation days and eight of the ten Federal holidays are observed during the supervised practice portion of the Coordinated Program.

 

RESPONSIBILITY:  The Coordinated Program Director will include specified days for all planned vacations and holidays on the schedules for the Coordinated Program.

 

PROCEDURE:

 

  1. The following vacation days are observed during the Coordinated Program.

 

  1. The day before and after Thanksgiving (2 days)
  2. The week of Christmas (4 days)
  3. The week of New Years (4 days)

 

  1. The following holidays are observed during the supervised practice.

 

  1. Labor Day
  2. Veterans Day
    Please note: When this holiday falls on Monday and university classes are in session, this will not be observed.
  3. Thanksgiving
  4. Christmas
  5. New Year’s Day
  6. Martin Luther King Jr. Day
  7. Memorial Day
  8. Independence Day

 

  1. There are no “Personal Days”.  If the need arises, compensatory time off may be requested by the Coordinated Program student and will be arranged by the Coordinated Program Director in coordination with the primary preceptor.

 

  1. Time off for religious holidays/observances may be requested at the beginning of the supervised practice by the student and will be arranged by the Coordinated Program Director.

 

 

 

Melinda Valliant, PhD, RD, LD

Coordinated Program Director

 

 

 

 

 

Completed application to the CP (see application form/click to get MS Word document)

Incomplete or late applications will NOT be considered.